New maritime e-resources

???????????????????????????????The Lloyd’s Marine Collection at Guildhall Library is among our most valued resources. We receive more e-mail and postal enquiries for this collection than for any other.

We are very pleased to announce that the library has some new online resources for maritime history researchers to complement the Lloyd’s collection.

Lloyd’s List & Lloyd’s List Intelligence
www.lloydslist.com & www.lloydslistintelligence.com

We are delighted to have subscription access to both Lloyd’s List and Lloyd’s List Intelligence. Both resources include a searchable, online archive back to 1997. This is great news for those of you whose vessel research requires shipping movements and marine news from 1997 onward. No more laboriously going through each issue on microfilm!

We were very sorry to see the demise of the printed version of Lloyd’s List in December 2013, especially as our collection goes back to the first (surviving) issue in 1741, so we are pleased to confirm that the archive continues in this new format (for use in Guildhall Library – proof of name and address required).

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Convoys Database
http://ww1.convoyweb.org.uk/guildhall/index.php

Guildhall Library has been honoured to host the work of the military historians who have given their time and knowledge to creating a database of the movements of World War Two Convoys. This work was begun in the 1980s by the late Arnold Hague (1930 – 2007); and has been continued by his associates.

Their invaluable work has only been accessible to staff members in the past, but has now been converted into an easily searchable website. Access to this resource is available in Guildhall Library only. We are very grateful for the generosity of researchers past and present and to the web master who willingly donated time and expertise in making this invaluable and accessible resource. We hope to expand and develop the site in the future so do look out for announcements.

ArcticStar

Ship Index
www.shipindex.org

We have subscribed to the premium version of this database and it is available not only to users within Guildhall Library but remotely for members of City of London Libraries.

The site now contains nearly 2.8 million citations compiled from indexes for books, journals, websites and other resources. Over 85% of the citations link to the full text, either through Google Books or to online resources and the vessel search is particularly useful for locating photographs of ships.

The citations also link to library catalogues helping you to locate material not available digitally.

Lloyd's list

Don’t forget to explore our Ebsco Discovery Service. With a City of London Library Card you can search in the library or at home for books, articles and reviews on maritime subjects using EBSCO, JSTOR and Oxford Reference. You can see a complete list and find an online form for joining the library at: http://capitadiscovery.co.uk/cityoflondon/assets/-/onlineref.html

We are committed to developing tools to help users to access our collections and we have been fortunate to have a dedicated group of volunteers who have completed some great work over the years, including putting over 250,000 voyage record cards which were in 6 chronological sequences into one alphabetical run!

The benefits of their labour and commitment are also felt by the many people who use Guildhall Library’s unique index to Lloyd’s List Marine News 1740 – 1837, freely available on our website: https://www.cityoflondon.gov.uk/lloydslist/

In the coming years we hope to be able to make further indexes to Board of Trade Reports and Inquiries and other material available and our volunteers are currently working on an index to marine news in Lloyd’s List covering the 1920s to the 1970s. The task will take some time and we are grateful for all of our (past and present) volunteers’ hard work over many hours.

For more information and guides about the Lloyd’s Marine Collection see http://www.cityoflondon.gov.uk/things-to-do/visiting-the-city/archives-and-city-history/guildhall-library/collections/Pages/Maritime-history.aspx
If you have any queries about access to any of these resources see the enquiry desk or e-mail us guildhall.library@cityoflondon.gov.uk

Jeanie Smith
Assistant Librarian

LR 1921-2

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Old Bailey Online

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Exactly ten years ago the launch of Old Bailey Online saw an unprecedented amount of information made available to researchers online. The Old Bailey Online project involved the digitisation of all surviving pages and transcripts of trials from the Old Bailey Session Papers between 1674 and 1913. It contains data from an astounding 197,745 criminal trails.

Guildhall Library has long held an extensive collection of Old Bailey material and was proud to be involved in the digitisation project. We were one of the original partners in the project, supplying original material for the Old Bailey Session Papers and the Ordinary of Newgate’s Accounts, as well as other pamphlets and sources related to London criminals and crime. Some of our material from the 18th century is believed to have originally belonged to the Old Bailey itself – and features stamps and annotations added by Old Bailey staff.

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When the service went online in March 2003, researchers, academics, students, genealogists and historians were treated to what is in fact the largest body of texts detailing the lives of non-elite people ever published – and it’s all free. The Ordinary of Newgate’s Accounts between 1676 and 1772 are included, along with biographical data on the approximately 2,500 men and women executed at Tyburn. And it’s not just about data – contemporary maps and images are also available.

Old Bailey Online is not only free but is fully searchable and fully downloadable. Researchers at Guildhall Library have reported that they find the indexes and the ability to search under any keyword to be particularly useful.

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All images above are taken from the ‘The black book of Newgate’ 1674-9, held at Guildhall Library.

And it’s not just researchers into crime who have benefited from Old Bailey Online – its data can be used for numerous other topics, especially those covering social history. It has proven extraordinarily valuable for family historians, and not only for those with criminal ancestors – people who have relatives who were victims, jury members, witnesses and members of the legal profession also find this source very useful.

Old Bailey Online can be found at: http://www.oldbaileyonline.org/

The original sources can still be accessed at Guildhall Library.

A catalogue of items from Newgate Prison, held in Guildhall Library's collections.

A catalogue of auction items from Newgate Prison, held at Guildhall Library.